60% of car seats are installed incorrectly!!

And 99% of parents thinks they are correctly fitted!

According to Good Egg Safety, on a national level, 6 out of 10 car seats are installed incorrectly! That is scary!

 “Figures released by Good Egg Safety indicate a 13% rise in badly fitted child car seats in the four-year period 2010-2013.
The figures – which are based on more than 10,500 tests conducted by Good Egg across England, Scotland and Wales – show a rise in unsafe fitting
from 47% in 2010, to 55% in 2011, 57% in 2012 and 60% in 2013.” – Road Safety GB <<Article>>

 

That they are installed incorrectly doesn’t just mean that they look like this:

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The car seat is not even installed. The seatbelt has just been strapped across the car seat and baby, and buckled in. A fatality waiting to happen!

 

It can be something “small” that we might not even think that much about, like this:

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Straps are so loose that in the event of any impact, the child is most likely going to be sent flying out of the seat. Straps need to be nice and snug!

 

What can happen if the straps aren’t tight enough? This crash test video will show you (below):

 

Another lethal error that is seen are these:

Charlie is showing an ill fitted baby carrier. Photo cred: rearfacingtoddlers.com

Charlie is showing an ill fitted baby carrier. Photo cred: rearfacingtoddlers.com

 

The picture on the left shows the shoulder belt threaded in the path of where the lap belt should go, and the lap belt is going behind the seat through the path of what should be the shoulder belt. The picture on the right shows the the car seat forward facing.

The baby car seat we buy is a Group 0+ seat. They can only be installed rear facing! There are no “faces both ways” in this group of car seats! If the baby’s car seat is installed like this, this is what is going to happen (video below):

This crash test video shows us what an impact at 64km/h looks like if the car seat is installed incorrectly, like the two photos above. It’s not a pretty sight is it? Personally I find it a little hard to watch. 😦

Some errors are all most invisible to the naked eye..

  • Foot-prop:
notgreen

Always remember to make sure the green light is either “glowing” or “showing” clearly! This indicates that the foot-prop is correctly installed on the ground.

 

The foot prop should always have the green indicator showing clearly when snapped in place. If it doesn’t have any indicators make sure it’s firmly placed on the ground and in the correct angle according to your car seat manual.

 

  • Harness postiion:

 

Straps FF

Britax Duelfix installed in ‘forward facing’ mode. Straps are below shoulders. This is wrong.

 

When the car seat is installed in the forward facing position, the correct placement of the harness is at or above the child’s shoulders. Not below, like Henry is demonstrating in this picture. This is very important because when the child is forward facing during a frontal collision, the crash forces will cause the child’s body to be thrown forward. The harness straps should be positioned at or above the child’s shoulders when forward facing to most effectively decrease the amount of distance the child will travel when propelled forward and to limit the forces on the child’s spine and shoulders.

Crash test video example of wrongly positioned harness:

 

Britax Max Way is a rear facing car seat. Headrest is pulled to the top, making the straps go far above the child's shoulders.

Britax Max Way is a rear facing car seat. Headrest is pulled to the top, making the straps go far above the child’s shoulders.

 

 

During a frontal crash, the most common type of collision, the crash forces will cause a rear facing child’s body to ride up the seat shell back. The harness straps should be positioned at or below the child’s shoulders to firmly hold the child down in the car seat. If the harness straps are above the child’s shoulders when rear facing, the child would continue to ride up the seat back and potentially expose their head above the car seat shell, leaving their head vulnerable to injury. This is particularly important in infant car seats (Group 0/0+)!

 

  • Isofix:

 

Isofix. Photo credit: http://bit.ly/1eBKDCZ

Isofix.
Photo credit: http://bit.ly/1eBKDCZ

 

Even with ISOFIX seats, you can get a bad install. Here only one of the ISOFIX connectors are properly plugged in. This can easily happen, so make sure to check that the connectors are green and good to go! 🙂

 

  • Buckle crunch:
Buckle crunch! Photo credit: http://bit.ly/1hDlVIr

Buckle crunch!
Photo credit: http://bit.ly/1hDlVIr

Not all car seats fit in all cars. A common problem is ‘buckle crunch’. If your car seat has this, it’s not compatible with either your car, or that position in the car. Some seats offer more then one belt path and some cars have different belt buckles depending on where in the car you are. Always make sure you watch out for this! 🙂

 

  • Belt path:

Crash test video of wrong belt path install:

The car seat has red for forward facing belt path, and blue for rear facing belt path. This is universal on all car seats. Make sure you read your car seat manual fully and properly while installing your car seat! 🙂

* * *

 

I hope this post has been informative! 🙂 ❤

For my post dedicated to the harness and how to keep your child safe in the car seat during colder times, please go HERE!

 

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Click image to go to GoodEgg’s website and search for a Free car seat check near you!

 

Q:// Did you learn something new? Did you find this post informative?
Let me know in a comment below what type of errors you have come across! 🙂

 

 

 

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3 Years Rear Facing! And still going strong!

3 Years Rear Facing! And still going strong!

Today we celebrate 3 whole years of rear facing and 2 years of Extended Rear Facing. 🙂

Happy Birthday Caitlyn Anabelle! ❤

We will continue to rear face for many years more!! 🙂

If this is new to you, please have a look at http://rearfacing.co.uk/facts.php and http://www.rearfacingtoddlers.com/why-rear-facing-is-safer.html to understand why rear facing is so important! 🙂

It’s never too late to educate! When we know better we do better! 

Britax Two Way Elite – A Toddler’s Point of View

Happy Holidays!  😀 Our holiday started off with a bang, and we are currently cruising around in a 5-door hatchback Fiat Punto 2003 model! Not to worry, hubby is OK, but our car is not, so my wonderful father in law has lent us he’s stepson’s car for a while. 🙂 So with no further ado, here is the Britax Two Way Elite in a Fiat Punto 2003, and it’s in the front seat! ❤ It’s is a convertible car seat that rear faces to 25KG, and is also now the only manufactured seat that harnesses to 25KG forward facing, as the Britax Xtensafix is no longer in production.  I do however strongly advocate for using it rear facing as it’s outgrown at the same time both ways!

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The Battle between WordPress.com & WordPress.org!

The Battle between WordPress.com & WordPress.org!

As the picture suggests, I have a dilemma. It’s not a big one, but it’s there.
Now, I have been quiet for quite some time, though on my twitter and Facebook I have not been (so you might want to run and give me a like and a follow! 😉 )

Currently this blog is on wordpress.com, BUT I have recently bought a domain and with that comes the option of switching to WordPress.org!
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Joie Stages – A Toddler’s Point of View!

So recently I decided to switch the little ones around, putting Henry (9 mo) in the ‘BeSafe’ and Caitlyn Anabelle (29 mo) in the ‘Joie’, and see how that would work out. 🙂

I wanted to see how much room she would have, just to give me a clue really, I’ve seen a lot of questions about having a toddler in the ‘Joie’ so I thought it was about time I could show you how it looks in our Citroen C5.

Caitlynjoie2

 As you can see, she fits really well. 😀
Legs all over the place dangling off or on, she couldn’t make up her mind on where to have them. haha
Personally I think she likes the angle of the seat. It seams to be more reclined and far deeper then the ‘BeSafe’.

I previously posted Henry in the ‘Joie’, so you can see a comparison.

All in all I think it works very well!

//Q: Do you have any pictures of your toddler in the ‘Joie’? 🙂

Room with a view…

A lot of people ask me if I’m not afraid that I wont see my rear facing children. 🙂
They also ask me about the legs, wont there be a leg issue? A room issue? What if we crash and their legs are “like that”, wont that damage them? – and so forth. A lot of questions and concerns.
Understandably so if you have never really had any experience with extended rear facing, or haven’t really had the pleasure of seeing it in action. 😀

Let me show you what I see my friends. 😀

CAmirror

And as for the legs, well.. there’s plenty of room for them too. 🙂
You see, ERF seats are made to accommodate sitting with your back rear facing, so they are generally built to give you better leg room then you would have if you just took a forward facing seat and turned it around. Something a lot of people tend to think is what an ERF seat is. hehe 🙂

comfyfeets

I hope this has shown you that it is in fact not a problem to rear face. 🙂

If  you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask!  🙂