The “Bottom Flooring Compartments” problem…

Some of the content of this post is taken with permission from http://addictedtobabystuff.com 

I have thrown up a reblog of the whole post (found here), but I thought since it’s such a long post, I’ll just post the actual email in a separate post. 🙂

The email is from Robert Bell who is considered an expert in this field. Robert Bell was CEO at Britax Nordiska throughout the 90s. Today he own Sakta (Sakerhetsbutikken) where he sells car seats and other safety equipment. He trains staff in car seat safety, is a member of the SIS-committee, and is involved in the development of car seats, so works closely together with the manufacturers.

Here is he’s email answering our question to the everlasting debate: IS it safe to use a filler in a bottom floor compartment, or if long enough, extend the foot-prop leg of the car seat all the way down to the bottom?
Continue reading

Advertisements

The Sun KILLS!

wheresbaby_4c_horz

Summer has reached us for full force all around parts of the world, and in this time of sunshine and happiness tragic things occur. Every year there is sadly at least one incident in the media of a parent leaving their child in the car.
Luckily this doesn’t always end in tragedy, but far too often it does.

In the US so far this year, 15 children have died as a result of heat stroke from being left in the car.

*So far in 2013 there have been at least fifteen deaths of children unattended in vehicles; seven which has been confirmed as heatstroke and eight which, based upon the known circumstances, are most likely heatstroke (2013 list).  Last year there were at least thirty-two deaths of children (see 2012 list) due to hyperthermia (heatstroke) after being left in or having gained access to hot cars, trucks, vans and SUV’s.  Since 1998 there have been at least 575 documented cases of heatstroke deaths of children in vehicles.  This study shows that these incidents can occur on days with relatively mild (i.e., ~ 70 degrees F) temperatures and that vehicles can reach life-threatening temperatures very rapidly.* – http://www.ggweather.com/heat/

  • Circumstances
    • An examination of media reports about the 559 child vehicular heatstroke deaths for an thirteen year period (1998 through 2012) shows the following circumstances:
      • 52% – child “forgotten” by caregiver (288 Children)
      • 29% – child playing in unattended vehicle (163)
      • 18% – child intentionally left in vehicle by adult  (100)
      • 2% – circumstances unknown (9)
  • Ages
    Children that have died from vehicular heatstroke in the United States (1998-2012) have ranged in age from 5 days to 14 years.  More than half of the deaths are children under 2 years of age.  Below are the percentage of total deaths (and the number of deaths) sorted by age.
    • Less than 1 year old = 31% (171)
    • 1-year old = 22% (122)
    • 2-years old = 20% (109)
    • 3-years old = 14% (78)
    • 4-years old = 6% (33)
    • 5-years old = 3% (17)
    • 6-years old = 2% (9)
    • 7-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 8-years old = 1% (3)
    • 9-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 10-years old = 1% (3)
    • 11-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 12-years old = < 1% (1)
    • 13-years old = < 1% (1)
    •  14-years old = < 1% (2)
    • Unknown = < 1% (2)

– Info grabbed from http://www.ggweather.com/heat/

The European Safety Alliance writes this on their info fact sheet:

Did you know that:
• During warm weather, car temperatures can rise 10 to 15
degrees Celsius every 15 minutes! Opening windows does not significantly slow down
the rate of temperature change.1
• A child’s body temperature rises 3 to 5 times faster than an adult’s due to lower water
reserves. 2
• Hyperthermia can occur in as little as 20 minutes, and fatalities within 2 hours.
Hyperthermia can occur on days as cool as just 22 degrees Celsius, when the inside of
a car can easily reach 47 degrees Celsius.3
• Most of the victims of hyperthermia incidents in cars are between 0 – 4 years of age.1

They also have some good presentational tips for  you:

Prevention Tips
• Dial 112 immediately if you see a child or children alone in a car.
• Place your personal items (purse, telephone, briefcase) on the floor of the backseat. That
way you are more likely to remember that the child is with you when you exit the car.
• Place the child’s personal items (diaper bag, bottle) in the front seat as a reminder to you.• Add a “reminder” to your computer calendar programme or telephone to ask if you dropped
your child/children off at day care/pre-school today.
• Whenever there is a change in drop off and pick up arrangements, confirm the plans with
your partner.
• Arrange that your day care provider or babysitter will call you if the child is not dropped off
when expected.
• Lock your car doors and trunk once everybody has exited the vehicle. Keep keys out of
reach of children.

Full fact sheet found <<HERE>>

All in all the most important thing we can do is make sure to always check the back seat before leaving the vehicle!
When I’m at a parking lot I always scan the cars around me just to make sure.
Just so far this year in Norway, there has been no less then two cases in the media of a small infant left alone in the car. Luckily for both they were discovered,saved and are today live and well. Both cases was where a parent left the child knowingly “for for a bit” to do the grocery shopping, or in the other case it was to go have lunch…sigh…
In both cases a person broke into the car to get the child out, as is the right thing to do in my honest opinion, if I saw a child in a car all alone on a hot day (doesn’t have to be sunny!) in obvious distress I don’t think I would think twice about breaking in to save the child! You can also ring the police before you break in and request permission, which is then given, this takes care of any problems that could occur with insurance.
That said, I would still break in if the child seamed to be ‘sleeping’.

So please! Check the back seat before you exit and PLEASE don’t EVER leave a child (or dog for that matter) in the car alone in these summery months!!

Useful links of info:

http://www.safekids.org/heatstroke
http://childcare.about.com/od/caregonewrong/a/leftincar.htm
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/index.shtml
http://www.safercar.gov/parents/heatstroke.htm
http://www.childsafetyeurope.org

Carsickness – NOT a reason to Forward Face!

Image

Carsick…most of us has been there, and at some point most parents will have a child who suffers from it. Maybe not on a regular basis, but sometimes it happens.

So what do you do about it?
Too often I hear (or read..) that a parent chose to turn their child around FF (forward facing) too soon, because they claim carsickness, and it is then the parent’s belief that FF will cure the problem. You’ll even come across the claim that FF did cure the problem and the child is no longer carsick. The fact that the child is no longer carsick is of course a positive thing, no one likes to be ill, it’s neither fun or enjoyable, but FF is simply not the reason why the child is now “cured”.

– The FACTS:

80% OF ALL PEOPLE
WILL SUFFER FROM MOTION SICKNESS
AT 
ONE TIME OR ANOTHER
(http://www.motionsickness.org.za)

It is also a known fact (or maybe less known, but it’s still there) that women are more prone to travel sickness then men (especially during our cycle)  and children between 3 and 12 years of age are disproportionally prone to motion sickness.  But motion sickness is rare in children under 2 years! 😀

– The Cause?

Motion sickness is a conflict between your senses.  The brain relies on messages from your inner ear, muscles, and eyes to tell it how your body is moving. When any of these systems send different messages, you can get queasy.

This is often prone to happen if you ;

  • Read in the car – your inner ear knows you’re moving, but your muscles think that you are sitting still and your eyes don’t see anything moving because they’re looking at the page. Ergo – conflicting messages.
  • Think about being car sick – believe it or not, you can actually create it by worrying about it! Pretty cool…in an..not so cool way.
  • Ate a big meal before travelling, if the air is stuffy or filled with fumes. Oh and looking at a meal is going to make it worse, so I would advice not to.
  • Travel by boat. “Sea sickness” happens to pretty much all of us. It’s estimated that 100% of travellers experience it. Well, at least until you get used to the motion!

–  Signs and Symptoms:

The most common signs and symptoms of motion sickness include:

  • Nausea
  • Pale skin
  • Cold sweats
  • Vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Increased salivation
  • Fatigue

So what’s the CURE?

Believe it or not, doing more of the thing that made you car sick is going to help. Let me explain:
-You get carsick because you read in a book, or you read the map. Ergo, the more you read in the car/bus/train/plane, the less and less sick you will become, until your body has adapted. 😀

If travel sickness occurs, keeping the window open might help. Stopping the car and getting out for some fresh air is also helpful. If you are the driver and passenger(s) is feeling queasy  you should try and go easy on the turns in the road as that motion is not helping. Also putting on the Air-con or open windows.
For small children who are prone to travel sickness I would recommend “Sea bands”. You can get this at your local Boots or any other pharmacy  I used them for many many months every time I went into a car, even outside the car, while I was pregnant with my daughter. I was especially car sick then and had great help from those Sea Bands. 🙂
There is ofc always medication that can be taken to prevent travel sickness, but I’m not that sort of person who uses that, but if you ask your local pharmacist they would be able to help you there. 🙂

As a closing point, lets not forget that pretty much all children at one point or another will go through a phase where they do not want to go in the car. Not want to buckle in and so forth.
The important thing is: Never let your child dictate in car safety that would put them at risk! 🙂

Sources:  Motion sickness http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/motion-sickness-000110.htm#ixzz2UGCd1SRj
University of Maryland Medical Center
http://www.motionsickness.org.za/motion_sickness_003.htm
http://bodyandhealth.canada.com/channel_condition_info_details.asp?disease_id=183&channel_id=9&relation_id=10860

The ‘Joie Stages’ now @ Babies R Us

The most magnificent thing has happened – it’s almost boarding on a miracle, there is now a highly affordable Extended Rear-facing Car seat on the market!
And it’s at Babies R Us of all places!! 😀

It’s the Joie Stages.

joieall

Showing all the stages. 🙂
Photo by: https://www.facebook.com/RearFacingTheWayForward

It has a rear-facing limit of 18kg (40lb), and a forward facing limit of 25kg (55lb). 
Basically a very good seat for an affordable prize.
Until now, I’ve been reluctant to write about the Joie, simply because there was a lot of questions regarding the RF limit. You see the first stock of Joie was labled as RF 0+, which is 13kg, the same limit as any infant carrier, and then forward facing until 25kg.
This turned out to be, well..not entierly wrong, but neither right, because the seat itself had been tested and approved for rear-facing to 18kg.

I’ll let Margaret at Rearfacingtoddlers.com explain it better then I can;

The install is the same, because the whole seat is the same, nothing has changed. It always passed RF up to 18kg, but because that was never an official classification, they put 13kg on it, like the First Class Plus for example. Now that ERF is becoming more well known, they are now allowed to sell it as RF up to 18kg.

So there you have it! Be sure to make your way to the nearest Babies R Us and have a try! It doesn’t hurt to tell you that it comes in many different colours as well, for those that like that sort of thing. 😉
Just make sure you ask for the new stock in the white box, clearly labelled as rear facing to 18 kg! 🙂 

As you can see, white box and clearly labled! :)

As you can see, white box and clearly labled! 🙂
Photos by: https://www.facebook.com/RearFacingTheWayForward

//Q: Was this info helpful to you? 🙂