The “Bottom Flooring Compartments” problem…

Some of the content of this post is taken with permission from http://addictedtobabystuff.com 

I have thrown up a reblog of the whole post (found here), but I thought since it’s such a long post, I’ll just post the actual email in a separate post. 🙂

The email is from Robert Bell who is considered an expert in this field. Robert Bell was CEO at Britax Nordiska throughout the 90s. Today he own Sakta (Sakerhetsbutikken) where he sells car seats and other safety equipment. He trains staff in car seat safety, is a member of the SIS-committee, and is involved in the development of car seats, so works closely together with the manufacturers.

Here is he’s email answering our question to the everlasting debate: IS it safe to use a filler in a bottom floor compartment, or if long enough, extend the foot-prop leg of the car seat all the way down to the bottom?
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Bottom Compartments and ERF Car seats (Reblogged)

Bottom Compartments and ERF Car seats (Reblogged)

The short version: This is completely safe!!! 😀

addictedtobabystuff

I wanted to talk some more about car seats, following on from my last post. I’d like to think I  have done quite a fair bit of car seat research, but mostly I wanted to warn people about being mis-sold incorrectly fitted car seats.

Having done all the research I could take, I made an appointment with a store local to me, who “specialise in car seat fitting, especially extended rear facing, stocking the latest models. Our staff are fully trained by Britax, Be Safe and Maxi Cosi. We offer impartial expert advice and would recommend an appointment for our rear facing seats.'”. Their details are featured on rearfacing.co.uk.

Great, I thought, they would be the perfect people to help me, I was especially after someone who was impartial and who had lots of choice. I had thought (and seen on the websites that the ERF seats I really…

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The Holidays Are Coming!

…And with it comes cold weather, icy roads, snow and too many accidents!! 😦
Remember now in the cold to keep your little ones safe in their car seat!!

xmasseat

 No heavy jackets or snow suits!! If a knitted jumper or fleecy jacket isn’t enough, use an extra blanket in the car to cover them with after the harness is nice and snug. 🙂

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The Battle between WordPress.com & WordPress.org!

The Battle between WordPress.com & WordPress.org!

As the picture suggests, I have a dilemma. It’s not a big one, but it’s there.
Now, I have been quiet for quite some time, though on my twitter and Facebook I have not been (so you might want to run and give me a like and a follow! 😉 )

Currently this blog is on wordpress.com, BUT I have recently bought a domain and with that comes the option of switching to WordPress.org!
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Group 1 seats!

“IS there a difference in testing and quality?”
A reblogg of a friend of mine’s exelent information post on Group 1 seats and the difference between ALL the testing that we do here in Europe. She also brilliantly explains why, in car seats as with a lot of other products, you really do get what you pay for, and cheap is not necessarily good. 🙂

Working with Parents

MCaxiss

 

Weight: 9-18kg

Height: Top of ears level with top of seat

Direction of travel: Front or rear facing

Fitment: Seat belt or ISOfix

Other options: Impact shield

Introduction

A group 1 car seat is designed to restrain a child in the event of an impact.  They normally have a 5-point harness and are designed to hold the child in the seat and spread the force through the shoulder straps, hip and crotch straps.  It is law for every child to be restrained in the car in a suitable child restraint and there are very few exceptions.

Exceptions:

Taxi

Emergency journey (not shops or school!)

In both cases the child must the wear the adult seat belt, if available.

Why are there such big price differences?

This is such a common question and a valid one too.  Why would you pay £200 for a seat when you can get one…

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The Sun KILLS!

wheresbaby_4c_horz

Summer has reached us for full force all around parts of the world, and in this time of sunshine and happiness tragic things occur. Every year there is sadly at least one incident in the media of a parent leaving their child in the car.
Luckily this doesn’t always end in tragedy, but far too often it does.

In the US so far this year, 15 children have died as a result of heat stroke from being left in the car.

*So far in 2013 there have been at least fifteen deaths of children unattended in vehicles; seven which has been confirmed as heatstroke and eight which, based upon the known circumstances, are most likely heatstroke (2013 list).  Last year there were at least thirty-two deaths of children (see 2012 list) due to hyperthermia (heatstroke) after being left in or having gained access to hot cars, trucks, vans and SUV’s.  Since 1998 there have been at least 575 documented cases of heatstroke deaths of children in vehicles.  This study shows that these incidents can occur on days with relatively mild (i.e., ~ 70 degrees F) temperatures and that vehicles can reach life-threatening temperatures very rapidly.* – http://www.ggweather.com/heat/

  • Circumstances
    • An examination of media reports about the 559 child vehicular heatstroke deaths for an thirteen year period (1998 through 2012) shows the following circumstances:
      • 52% – child “forgotten” by caregiver (288 Children)
      • 29% – child playing in unattended vehicle (163)
      • 18% – child intentionally left in vehicle by adult  (100)
      • 2% – circumstances unknown (9)
  • Ages
    Children that have died from vehicular heatstroke in the United States (1998-2012) have ranged in age from 5 days to 14 years.  More than half of the deaths are children under 2 years of age.  Below are the percentage of total deaths (and the number of deaths) sorted by age.
    • Less than 1 year old = 31% (171)
    • 1-year old = 22% (122)
    • 2-years old = 20% (109)
    • 3-years old = 14% (78)
    • 4-years old = 6% (33)
    • 5-years old = 3% (17)
    • 6-years old = 2% (9)
    • 7-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 8-years old = 1% (3)
    • 9-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 10-years old = 1% (3)
    • 11-years old = < 1% (2)
    • 12-years old = < 1% (1)
    • 13-years old = < 1% (1)
    •  14-years old = < 1% (2)
    • Unknown = < 1% (2)

– Info grabbed from http://www.ggweather.com/heat/

The European Safety Alliance writes this on their info fact sheet:

Did you know that:
• During warm weather, car temperatures can rise 10 to 15
degrees Celsius every 15 minutes! Opening windows does not significantly slow down
the rate of temperature change.1
• A child’s body temperature rises 3 to 5 times faster than an adult’s due to lower water
reserves. 2
• Hyperthermia can occur in as little as 20 minutes, and fatalities within 2 hours.
Hyperthermia can occur on days as cool as just 22 degrees Celsius, when the inside of
a car can easily reach 47 degrees Celsius.3
• Most of the victims of hyperthermia incidents in cars are between 0 – 4 years of age.1

They also have some good presentational tips for  you:

Prevention Tips
• Dial 112 immediately if you see a child or children alone in a car.
• Place your personal items (purse, telephone, briefcase) on the floor of the backseat. That
way you are more likely to remember that the child is with you when you exit the car.
• Place the child’s personal items (diaper bag, bottle) in the front seat as a reminder to you.• Add a “reminder” to your computer calendar programme or telephone to ask if you dropped
your child/children off at day care/pre-school today.
• Whenever there is a change in drop off and pick up arrangements, confirm the plans with
your partner.
• Arrange that your day care provider or babysitter will call you if the child is not dropped off
when expected.
• Lock your car doors and trunk once everybody has exited the vehicle. Keep keys out of
reach of children.

Full fact sheet found <<HERE>>

All in all the most important thing we can do is make sure to always check the back seat before leaving the vehicle!
When I’m at a parking lot I always scan the cars around me just to make sure.
Just so far this year in Norway, there has been no less then two cases in the media of a small infant left alone in the car. Luckily for both they were discovered,saved and are today live and well. Both cases was where a parent left the child knowingly “for for a bit” to do the grocery shopping, or in the other case it was to go have lunch…sigh…
In both cases a person broke into the car to get the child out, as is the right thing to do in my honest opinion, if I saw a child in a car all alone on a hot day (doesn’t have to be sunny!) in obvious distress I don’t think I would think twice about breaking in to save the child! You can also ring the police before you break in and request permission, which is then given, this takes care of any problems that could occur with insurance.
That said, I would still break in if the child seamed to be ‘sleeping’.

So please! Check the back seat before you exit and PLEASE don’t EVER leave a child (or dog for that matter) in the car alone in these summery months!!

Useful links of info:

http://www.safekids.org/heatstroke
http://childcare.about.com/od/caregonewrong/a/leftincar.htm
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/index.shtml
http://www.safercar.gov/parents/heatstroke.htm
http://www.childsafetyeurope.org

Joie Stages – A Toddler’s Point of View!

So recently I decided to switch the little ones around, putting Henry (9 mo) in the ‘BeSafe’ and Caitlyn Anabelle (29 mo) in the ‘Joie’, and see how that would work out. 🙂

I wanted to see how much room she would have, just to give me a clue really, I’ve seen a lot of questions about having a toddler in the ‘Joie’ so I thought it was about time I could show you how it looks in our Citroen C5.

Caitlynjoie2

 As you can see, she fits really well. 😀
Legs all over the place dangling off or on, she couldn’t make up her mind on where to have them. haha
Personally I think she likes the angle of the seat. It seams to be more reclined and far deeper then the ‘BeSafe’.

I previously posted Henry in the ‘Joie’, so you can see a comparison.

All in all I think it works very well!

//Q: Do you have any pictures of your toddler in the ‘Joie’? 🙂